Volume 16, Issue 2 p. 92-101
Original Article

Effects of Exercise During or Postchemotherapy in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Jingchun Zeng PhD

Jingchun Zeng PhD

Resident Physician

Department of Acupuncture, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China

Search for more papers by this author
Jiaming Wu MM

Jiaming Wu MM

Resident Physician

Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Zhongshan, China

Search for more papers by this author
Chunzhi Tang PhD

Corresponding Author

Chunzhi Tang PhD

Professor

Clinical Research Center, South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China

Address correspondence to Chunzhi Tang, Nenggui Xu and Liming Lu, Clinical Research Center, South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006, China; [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
Nenggui Xu PhD

Corresponding Author

Nenggui Xu PhD

Professor

Clinical Research Center, South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China

Address correspondence to Chunzhi Tang, Nenggui Xu and Liming Lu, Clinical Research Center, South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006, China; [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
Liming Lu PhD

Corresponding Author

Liming Lu PhD

Associate Professor

Clinical Research Center, South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China

Address correspondence to Chunzhi Tang, Nenggui Xu and Liming Lu, Clinical Research Center, South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006, China; [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
First published: 10 March 2019
Citations: 11

Continuing Education : Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing is pleased to offer readers the opportunity to earn credit for its continuing education articles. Learn more here: https://www.sigmamarketplace.org/journaleducation

Abstract

Background

Exercise may effectively reduce side effects caused by chemotherapy. However, no meta-analyses of exercise during or postchemotherapy for cancer patients have been definitely performed to guide clinical practice.

Aims

To evaluate and summarize available scientific evidence to provide recommendations of an exercise intervention for cancer patients undergo chemotherapy.

Methods

A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed with databases searching of MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase from their inception to October 15, 2017. Literature was selected to identify randomized controlled trials of exercise during or postchemotherapy for cancer patients. Risk-of-bias assessment was performed by two reviewers independently. Data were analyzed using the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.3 (Review Man, Copenhagen, Denmark).

Results

A total of 10 trials with 838 participants were included in our study. Exercise could have a beneficial effect in cancer patients undergo chemotherapy in the outcome of physical fitness (MD: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.08–0.25, p < .01 and MD: 2.46, 95% CI: 1.44–3.47, p < .01) and depression (MD: −1.36, 95% CI: −2.68 to −0.04, p = .04), but not in FACT-G, FACT-B, anxiety, weight, and BMI (all p > .05). Exercise sequence (during or postchemotherapy) did not influence the effect of exercise for cancer patients undergo chemotherapy. In total, six studies were assessed as an overall low risk of bias. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses reached results similar to those of the meta-analyses, which reflected our results were reliable and robust.

Linking Evidence to Action

Exercise seems to have a beneficial effect on physical fitness and depression, but not on quality of life, anxiety, weight, and BMI. More specific and detailed description of the implementation of exercise programs should be proposed in the future.